Hearing Loss FAQ

Hearing Loss FAQ

What are the signs of hearing loss?

Symptoms of hearing loss include difficulty understanding what others are saying, asking people to repeat themselves, struggling to hear in crowded places with distracting background noise, the perception that others are mumbling or not speaking clearly, listening to the television or radio at a higher volume than others, experiencing a ringing or buzzing in the ears. You may find yourself withdrawing from social situations in order to avoid conversation and might experience depression.

What causes hearing loss?

A number of factors can cause hearing loss. The most common include aging, noise exposure, ear infections, excessive earwax, ear or head trauma, genetics, birth defects, benign growths or tumors, otosclerosis, Meniere’s disease and reactions to drugs.

Are there different types of hearing loss?

Yes. There are three types of hearing loss: Sensorineural, conductive and mixed. Sensorineural is the result of damage to the inner ear nerves. Conductive is the result of obstructions in the outer or middle ear. Mixed hearing loss is a combination of the other two types; this means that in one ear you have an issue with the outer or middle ear and the inner ear.

Can hearing loss be prevented?

Some types of hearing loss are preventable. Noise-induced hearing loss may be avoided by wearing proper hearing protection when exposed to occupational or recreational noise and turning down the volume on your TV, radio or personal music device. What resources are available for living with hearing loss?

Our audiologists are happy to answer any additional questions you have about your hearing. There are also several online resources for hearing impaired individuals, including lessersound™.